Why Go To The Urgicenter?

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urgicenter

Why Go To The Urgicenter?

Your child’s cough wakes you in the middle of the night. But it’s late, or a Sunday, or maybe even a holiday, and you don’t want to bother your pediatrician. So what do you do?

Rodd Stein MD, Westchester Health Pediatrics, urgicenter, urgent care centers, why go to urgicenters

Rodd Stein MD

Well, you could go to your local ER or urgicenter, or call one of those new FaceTime doctors who will “examine” your child virtually and prescribe the “appropriate” treatment. But just because urgicenters provide some kind of medical care doesn’t mean it is good medical care.

Or, you could call us, your child’s pediatrician.

Yes, we have private lives but we truly care about your child

We understand that the families we care for may think that we, as pediatricians, are so involved with our own lives during off hours that we are unapproachable, but I truly hope we have not given that impression. Sure, we may have families, and may enjoy sleeping undisturbed through the night, but I think I speak for most of my colleagues when I say that we prefer to be made aware of what is happening with our patients.

We want to be contacted, no matter how late or early the hour. And, we’d even like to see your child in person when you have a concern, even if it means staying late or going back to the office.

After all, you have entrusted us with your child’s care, and it is a responsibility we take very seriously. We are a group of medical professionals who feel that we and the specialists we practice with are the most capable of making the proper clinical decisions for your child.

Children are not merely small adults and a doc-in-the-box is not necessarily a pediatrician

ERs and urgicenters are usually staffed by internists or ER residents who will never go on to become board certified pediatricians. And there are conditions, both acute and chronic, that are diagnosed and treated differently by us and by them. For example: bronchitis, pharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infections, and even most ear infections rarely require antibiotics. Pneumonia doesn’t always require admission, and croup doesn’t require a helicopter ride to the nearest children’s hospital. (Yes, I’ve seen it.)

Instead of going to an urgicenter, call us. No matter the hour.

Stop by. Ask us questions in the supermarket or at birthday parties. We don’t charge for phone calls like “Docs on demand.” The advice we give is the best you can get, and if you catch my friend Dr. Pete Richel on the line, you can usually get it for a song.

By Rodd Stein, MD, FAAP, a pediatrician with Westchester Health Pediatrics

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About the Author: ML Ball